Boston Manor Underground Station

Boston Manor Underground Station

Boston Manor Road

Underground Station built in 1934 with earlier fabric from 1883.

Grade II Statutory listed.

English Heritage Listing

Piccadilly Line Underground station. 1933-34 by Charles Holden, with earlier fabric at platform level dating from 1883. Brown brick facing, reinforced concrete structure. Glazed ceramic tiles with enamelled London Underground logo on tower; vertical strip of glass bricks forming lighting feature along upper stages of tower.

EXTERIOR: Single storey structure on girders over railway bridge: booking hall to right, lit with clerestory; projecting shop unit to left with curved picture window. Flat roofs of concrete now with safety rails to edge (added recently).

Further information

Opened 1883 as part of the District Railway extension to Hounslow Barracks. Some of the original fabric on the platform level. Piccadilly line from March 1934. Boston Manor Station featured on the first class stamp issued in January 2013 to commemorate 150 years of London Underground.

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Boston Manor Underground Station

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Boston Manor Underground Station 51.495759, -0.324751 Boston Manor Underground Station

The Griffin

The Griffin, Brook Road South

The Griffin, Brook Road South

The Griffin, Brook Road South, Brentford TW8 0NP

Was and is a public house.

Built 1883.

History

Fuller Smith & Turner pub since 1883. Served as the first club house and changing room for the football club.

Regularly used for filming, including Green Street (2005) with Elijah Wood.

The Griffin has been run for over 16 years by Ralph and Sue Clifden who retire this weekend.

Further Information

Brentford’s Griffin Park is the only football ground in the UK with a pub on each corner, and this is one of those four pubs.

The Griffin

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The Griffin

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The Griffin 51.487105, -0.303041 The Griffin See full page article

Brook Road South – Growth of Housing

The first houses to be built after the land sale in 1872 were on the west side running north from Albany Road. They were numbered consecutively with numbers 8, 9, 10 and 11 north of Grosvenor Road which ran down hill to towards the recreation ground. They were called Grosvenor Terrace and are now numbers 14, 16, 18 and 20 Brook Road South.

The builder, Henry Spicer lived at the Lord Nelson PH in Enfield Road was brought to account in 1883 for allowing these 4 houses to be occupied without giving notice to the Sanitary Authority. Continue reading