Looking after bikes during football matches

Memory of Mr Stan Prince who lived at No. 92 Brook Road:

Brook Road end of Griffin Park

Brook Road end of Griffin Park

“On days when the bikes used to come around, my dad would give me a couple of shillings for helping him. People used to cycle all the way from Windsor and Staines to watch Brentford play.

“This was before cars began to come in, and trains were expensive. Blokes used to jump off the bikes, we’d give them a ticket; we slapped a ticket on the bike and they’d run off to get into the queue for the ground.

“We used to run ’em through the house. We’d have loads of bikes in there. Threepence a time. You might rake in about 15 shillings. At the end of the game, they’d be saying, ‘where’s my bl**dy lamp gone; where’s my pump!’ Continue reading

Brook Road Sweet Shop

Micky and Albert Mancey's sweet shop, 38 Brook Road

Micky and Albert Mancey’s sweet shop, 38 Brook Road

“The corner of Brook Road and Lateward Road, Brentford, is of particular significance for Micky and Albert Mancey, who now live in Ealing Road, Brentford. It is here where the Brentford couple first met more than 50 years ago, when Albert used to buy chocolates for his niece from what was then a confectionery and tobacconist owned by Micky’s mother.

“Our picture in the Looking Back section below, taken of the shop in 1926, shows (from left) Micky; her mother, Hetty Wastell; and sister Nelly, who now lives in Christchurch. Continue reading

Daubney’s Greengrocers, 45 Brook Road

Daubney's Greengrocers, 45 Brook Road

Long established family shopkeepers are difficult to find in towns today. But in Brentford, if you wander around the Victorian terraced back streets, a small handful of them still open their doors for business every day – a tradition that dates back generations.

Greengrocer, Bill Daubney, aged 65, is one whose name has been above his shop in Brook Road South for the last 46 years, and could conjure up an entire panorama of Brentford as fresh as his vegetables.

Bill produced two oval gilt framed portraits of his parents, “I only found them the other day” he said. He recalled that the pictures cost 24 shillings each. “My mother paid 6d a week for them” he said.

Bill, his parents and seven brothers and sisters , lived in a small cottage in Albany Road, one street away from where he works now.

His father was a greengrocer, and his grandfather worked in the fish trade. Both were born and bred in Brentford. Continue reading

Brook Road South – Growth of Housing

The first houses to be built after the land sale in 1872 were on the west side running north from Albany Road. They were numbered consecutively with numbers 8, 9, 10 and 11 north of Grosvenor Road which ran down hill to towards the recreation ground. They were called Grosvenor Terrace and are now numbers 14, 16, 18 and 20 Brook Road South.

The builder, Henry Spicer lived at the Lord Nelson PH in Enfield Road was brought to account in 1883 for allowing these 4 houses to be occupied without giving notice to the Sanitary Authority. Continue reading