40 The Butts

40 The Butts

Residence built in 18th century.

Grade II statutory listed.

In Butts Conservation Area.

English Heritage Listing

C18. Brown brick. 3-storeys. 2 double-hung sashes in reveals with red brick rubbed flat arches, no glazing bars (at time of listing July 1951). Very fine doorway, fluted Corinthian pilasters, entablature with carved frieze and dentil cornice, panelled reveal, altered 6-panel door. Central 1st floor window has semi- circular arch and raised keystone. Rendered plinth. NMR.

Further Information

English Heritage requires update: Glazing bars reinstalled.

Glynis Chorley (via Facebook) tells us that the black gates to the right are from the old Ealing Road School.

31-32 The Butts

31-32 The Butts

Residence built in 18th century.

Grade II statutory listed.

In Butts Conservation Area.

English Heritage Listing

C18. Brown brick. 2-storey, 2 windows flush frame wood reveals, glazing bars. 2 later dormers. Slate mansard roof. Ground floor windows have cambered arches. Modern door with blocked fan and hood. NMR

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31-32 The Butts

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31-32 The Butts 51.484316, -0.308685 31-32 The Butts

 

24 The Butts

24 The Butts

Residence built in 18th century, or possibly 1690.

Grade II statutory listed.

In Butts Conservation Area.

English Heritage Listing Description

Early C18. Brown brick with red brick dressings. 2-storeys, basement and attic, 4 double-hung sashes in plain surrounds. Basement has plinth, windows have cambered relieving arches; ground floor windows have segmental arches with projecting keystones. Sunk rectangular window apron panels below 1st floor windows. Modillion eaves cornice, machine tile hipped roof, 2 segmental- headed dormers. Doorway: 6 fielded panel door, traceried fanlight, surround of narrow panels, bracketed hood. NMR.

Further Information

According to historical records, this building could be as early as 1690.

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24 The Butts

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24 The Butts 51.484582, -0.308824 24 The Butts

The Markets and Growers of Brentford

At the end of the thirteenth century the Manor of Boston was given to the Priory of St Helen’s, Bishopsgate by King Edward I. It’s thought that the Priory may have used the Manor as a country retreat and as a place to grow food. Later they were granted a charter to hold a weekly market and an annual six day fair around St Lawrence’s Day in August.

The stalls would originally have been along the High Street – at that time little more than a wide track – but the market flourished due to easy access by river and locally grown produce for sale. By about 1587 it expanded in to an orchard on the north side of the High Street still called Market Place and expanded in to the Butts.

Locally grown produce was sold to merchants from London. Transport links by road and river were good and the carts and boats carrying  fruit and vegetables returned filled with what was politely called ‘night soil’ which was used as fertiliser. Baskets for carrying the fruit and vegetables were made locally from the osiers cut from the willow trees grown on the aits or islands in the Thames. Continue reading